Regnskogsföreningen skickade i maj in en ansökan om ett fortsatt projekt i Karibkorridoren. Ansökan kommer att utvärderas under 2016 av Forum Syd. Ansökan är på engelska och sammanfattas här:

PROJECT SUMMARY

During 2017 through 2019 the Rain Forest Society will continue its partnership with Equipe de Conservacao da Amazonia – Ecam, to support the indigenous tribes and Quilombola (1) traditional communities living in the Karib eco-corridor in the Brazilian Amazon, in effectively addressing increasing pressures, improving their quality of life and sustaining natural resources within a rainforest corridor nearly two-thirds of the size of Sweden.

Both indigenous and Quilombola communities face increasing pressures while still struggling to fully ascertain their rights to their territories and their ability to fully represent themselves. Previous projects have strengthened the target indigenous associations and  empowering women’s participation, aiding in the recognition of a significant portion of traditional lands. These advances demonstrated the need to expand to the Quilombola communities to ensure collaboration between the groups in confronting increasing external pressures on their lands—given that the integrity of the Karib Ecocorridor is threatened if all traditional land claims within the region are not properly addressed.

The project will strengthen traditional associations and community territorial management as well as strengthen various civil society organizations in the target municipalities. The work with local municipalities will also be expanded to improve local governance. The project will continue its strengthening of women’s participation and expand community autonomy and resilience. An external independent evaluation will assist the project partners in evaluating the impact of the work. Additional systems for monitoring and verification will continue to be strengthened as part of Ecam’s commitment in including Results Based Monitoring within its planning and management procedures. RF will closely accompany the monitoring of the project.

The total indigenous areas included in the project are 11 470 920 hectars, and the Quilombola land is 379 708 hectars (titled land) and about 420 000 hectars (untitled land).

The overall goal is to have “the indigenous tribes and Quilombola traditional communities living in the Karib eco-corridor in the Brazilian Amazon effectively addressing increasing pressures, improving their quality of life, and sustaining natural resources within a rainforest corridor nearly two thirds of the size of Sweden”, with the specific subprojects:

1. Territorial management and protection

2. Association strengthening

3. Municipal governance

4. Alternative income generation

5. Strengthening of Ecam

 

[1] Quilombola
(or as they are also known “Maroons”) are members of traditional Afro-Brazilian forest communities who are descendants of African slaves who escaped from the plantations and established traditional communities in various parts of Brazil including many in the Amazon.